Friday, October 23, 2009

Halliburton / KBR ... The Sequel

In February 2009, Halliburton Co., KBR Inc., and Kellogg Brown & Root LLC agreed to resolve parallel DOJ and SEC FCPA enforcement actions concerning improper payments to Nigerian officials in connection with the Bonny Island liquefied natural gas project. (see here, here, and here).

The combined $579 million in fines and penalties remains the most ever against a U.S. company for FCPA violations.

Included in the web of companies involved in the Nigeria conduct was M.W. Kellogg Company ("MWKL"), a United Kingdom joint venture 55% owned by KBR. MWKL is mentioned in the linked DOJ and SEC materials above.

It looks like Halliburton's exposure via M.W. Kellogg is not over.

Today, in a 10-Q filing (see here - p. 10), Halliburton stated as follows:

"In the United Kingdom, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) is considering civil claims or criminal prosecution under various United Kingdom laws and appears to be focused on the actions of MWKL, among others. Violations of these laws could result in fines, restitution and confiscation of revenues, among other penalties, some of which could be subject to our indemnification obligations under the master separation agreement. Our indemnity for penalties under the master separation agreement with respect to MWKL is limited to 55% of such penalties, which is KBR’s beneficial ownership interest in MWKL. Whether the SFO pursues civil or criminal claims, and the amount of any fines, restitution, confiscation of revenues or other penalties that could be assessed would depend on, among other factors, the SFO’s findings regarding the amount, timing, nature and scope of any improper payments or other activities, whether any such payments or other activities were authorized by or made with knowledge of MWKL, the amount of revenue involved, and the level of cooperation provided to the SFO during the investigations."

It used to be that companies with FCPA exposure could get a good night's sleep after resolving DOJ and (if an issuer) SEC enforcement actions.

As this action (and others in recent years) demonstrate, the landscape has changed and "tag-a-long" FCPA-like enforcement actions or inquiries in other countries I think will become the new norm.

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